Ever Have a Tea Make You Sigh and Say “Thank You”. . . Organic Earl Grey Cream/Tigerlily Tea

Have you ever had a cup of tea that made you sigh and whisper “thank you” to no one in particular?

No? Prepare to.

This tea is a buttery, creamy, decadent romp through Earl Grey’s castle. You walk barefoot on lush, oriental carpets. You admire vibrant paintings of rosy-cheeked angels. You wear a robe of crushed velvet.

You taste bergamot, you taste flowers, and good heavens, you taste cream.

You are fancy. No, more than fancy. You are reckless in your bourgeois ways. You are DECADENT.

I don’t really have any complaints about this tea. I almost want a drawback, so I look like an Objective Journalist. Alas, I am not a Serious Writer or a Great Thinker. I am a girl who wears mostly slippers. I pet every dog I see on the street. I want to live in a Rococo painting. And I like this tea. So there.

 


Want to Know More About This Tea?

Leaf Type:  Black

Where to Buy: Tigerlily Teas

Description

A remarkably heady Earl Grey tempered with wickedly delicious cream flavour. One cup is not enough!

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

all photo credits/logo credits:  Tigerlily Teas

This tea was purchased for personal use and was not recieved to review.

 

“An Afternoon Of Meetings Calls for Pu-erh” Forest Song/Global Tea Hut

An afternoon of meetings calls for a sweet, ripe pu’erh, or at least, that’s how I feel about it.

I grabbed this tea for the first time, and it delivered. I got something rich. Something heavy. Something that could help me beat up the opposition.

This isn’t a fishy or old-tasting or spicy pu’erh. It’s a beautiful older woman. It’s basically a bunch of flowers, wisened with age, kind of tough. Like Olenna Tyrell.

This tea is called “forest song” because — as I discovered on Global Tea Hut’s blog — trees respond to sound. It turns out that plants grow best when they’re exposed to the same sort of pitches as birdsong. Birds are the sign of a healthy forest. So when trees hear those pitches, they grow better.

As nature gets trashed by global warming, deforestation, extinction, etc, the songs of the forest are going to change. And tea production is going to change.

That’s right, guys: our planet’s tea is at risk.

Call Captain Planet.

We’ve gotta fix this.


Want to Know More About This Tea?

Leaf Type:  Pu-erh

Where to Buy:  Global Tea Hut

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

The Tea That Smells Like Lemon Drops. . . Green Lemon/Newby Tea

“If a cup of tea won’t fix it, you really do have a problem.”

I don’t remember where I read that recently, but it seems pretty true at times. I was in a bit of a grump and decided to have a cuppa. This one is new to me, not just the flavor but the brand itself. Mine is an individually wrapped tea bag but the company also sells sachets and loose leaf.

Green lemon had the potential to go bad, very bad. Green tea can be pretty astringent and raw, and lemon can be puckeringly sour, so a combination of the wrong types of those two could be a mistake of epic proportions. Okay, it could turn out to be a bad cup of tea, but when you are in a grump, that is a pretty big mistake.

Instead, I started singing as soon as I picked up my cup. “Where troubles melt like lemon drops, away above the chimney tops, that’s where you’ll find me!”

This tea smells just like lemon drops! Which I love! Bright and sunny, sweet and happy! Yes, it is a little brisk as most green teas are, but it tastes great and I feel the sun peeking out from behind the clouds. No puckering here, just a smile.

Since I needed tea fast, I appreciate the instructions that said to only steep for one to two minutes, and I kept it short. I could handle cup after cup of this. It is so lemony good you might almost hope for a sore throat just for an excuse to sip it all day long.


Want to Know More About This Tea?

Leaf Type:  Green

Where to Buy:  Newby Tea

Description

This tea is no longer available but click below for blends that are.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

My Monday Adventure with Raspberry Black Pine/Teaside. . . .

Happy Monday morning tea friends!

Today, I needed a tea adventure. I needed something different than my usual.  Work has been a bit more complex lately and I wanted something unique to enjoy and distract me from what was going on in my inbox. So I closed my eyes and grabbed this beauty from Teaside- Raspbery Black Pine, a Shu pu-erh.  Pu-erh and I are acquaintances and I don’t spend the time I need to with this tea variety.  I’ve tried and tried to really get into pu-erh but for the most part, I become very overwhelmed. I see all of these amazing pics on Instagram and the knowledge those folks have of pu-erh and I so want to be in that crowd- but always seem to see another shiny spoon or dive back into my favorite oolongs or a solid black tea instead.

To get my tea party started, I prepped up my water and brought out my new gaiwan and started to get myself centered. I completed my first rinse of the lovely tea and started working on my first steeping. First steeping in, I was really taken back my how lovely the brew looked. Rich tones of brown with a hint of red almost purple around the edges. Took a sip and really only got creamy notes and not a whole lot of anything else.  I’m assuming I just didn’t steep long enough so I went about setting up my next cuppa.  The next few goes were a bit of the same so I added a bit more leaf, allowed the tea to brew longer, and tried again.

This time, the taste was more what I was looking for.  The earthy notes were really shining and there was a hint of a sweetness here and there but I wouldn’t say it was fruity.  A nutty note is also creaping in.  Delicious and incerdibly warming.

Reading over the views, it appears this shu dose take a few steeps before really opening up and I think I’m hitting that point now. Each sip I’m really digging this tea more and more. The aftertaste is really started to define itself and I’m almost loving that tail end of the sip more than the actual drinking of the tea.

Right here is one of the reasons why I love tea so very much.  The adventure the tea takes you while you are going about your day.  This would be a lovely tea to really sit and enjoy but unfortunately, my days anymore are a bit busy so I will be enjoying this delight the best way I can today.

As a lof of us tea enthusiasts say- there is no wrong way to enjoy tea.  I know that I may not be steeping this tea in a 100% true gongfu fashion but my set and this lovely ripe pu-erh up is truly adding some much needed tea love to my day.  Excited to see what additional steeps bring me today!


Want to Know More About This Tea?

Leaf Type:  Pu-erh

Where to Buy:  Teaside

Description

Craft Shou (Ripe) Pu-erh made of spring 2018 material from Thai 300-500-year-old trees. Chiang Rai province, northern Thailand, 1300 meters above sea level.

Fermented in September 2018.

The dry tea smells milky, raspberry and conifer with hints of salinity. In the taste is an interesting interweaving of coniferous oily tones with raspberries and dairy. Since the 3-4 infusion, sweet woodiness and almonds appear. Aftertaste with pine and walnut tones, slight bitterness.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

Nepali Breakfast/Nepal Tea

When prepping breakfast, I learned that I can’t use my toaster oven and kettle at the same time. That was an interesting discovery that made for a two-step breakfast: bagel first (since the toaster oven was already on) and tea second.

Another discovery: Nepali Breakfast by Nepal Tea is not a straight black tea like I thought it was. When I opened the package, I immediately got a big whiff of masala spices which surprised me. Upon closer inspection of the package, it turns out the package says black tea + spices so I guess this confusion is just on me. Oops.

Anyways, when brewing this up, I did so according to the company suggestion on the package which is to steep the tea in boiling water for 5 minutes. That is against my usual steeping parameters but hopefully Nepal Tea knows best.

After steeping the tea I brought up the Nepali Breakfast page on the Nepal Tea website only to notice that the site says to use not quite boiling water for 4-5 minutes. I also noticed on the Nepal Tea website they recommend steeping this with milk and/or sugar. Again, I did not see this until after I steeped the tea so I did not do this.

Trying the tea, the first thing I noticed is how much sugar probably would have helped this tea. I normally don’t add anything to my tea (unless I am having a latte or smoothie, etc.) but this tea is more bland than the scent of the dry leaf would have you expect. I think perhaps sugar might coax out those spices nicely since nothing really stands out. With that said, despite the fairly harsh steeping parameters, there is no bitterness or astringency here. Mostly just some cinnamon, a touch of clove, maybe a little pepper and a smooth black tea that doesn’t really impart much flavor.

I think this tea has potential but for me it fell short. The smell of the tea really had me thinking I was in store for a punch of spice but barely got a tap on the shoulder.


Want to Know More About This Tea?

Leaf Type:  Black

Where to Buy:  Nepal Tea

Description

Start the day the Nepalese way with our unique Masala Chiyah.

A blend of Orthodox, CTC teas and our special masala spice mix. Experience the color of CTC, flavors of Orthodox with the ‘zing’ of the home-made spice mix.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!