Cherry Blossom/DAVIDs Tea

It is late at night and I am already sleepy.  I want something light and sweet as a bedtime treat, so I chose Cherry Blossom. Although it is primarily labeled as a white tea, this is a actually a blend of white and green tea with cherries, coconut chips, rosebuds, and natural and artificial cherry flavoring.

Cherry flavor can so easily go wrong. So many cherry teas (and other cherry flavored things) taste like cherry cough syrup, which is NOT what I am looking for. Remember Luden’s Cherry Cough Drops? Now THAT I could handle, or real sweet cherries, but not something that tastes like actual cough syrup. (Not a rooibos fan as a general rule because it tastes like cough syrup to me. It takes throwing in a ton of flavoring to make it palatable for me.)

Happily, this didn’t go wrong. The coconut is giving it body and creaminess, the rose adds a little sweetness but honestly not a ton of floral flavor, and the main event is definitely sweet cherry without the cough syrup BLARG.

This one has really been a hit with family and friends, and I think the next step is to try it iced and see what happens!


Want to Know More About This Tea?

Leaf Type:  White/Green Blend

Where to Buy:  DAVIDs Tea

Description

This tea is no longer available but click below for teas that are.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

Pre-Ming Dragonwell /Mei Mei Tea

A few years ago had you had asked me if the time of year matters for when you plucked a leaf I would have shrugged my shoulders. But once you really delve into the world of tea it’s amazing what you will learn.

Pre-Ming for example is any tea harvested before a specific date, this being the Qing Ming festival. In this year of the Dragon 2020, the festival falls on April 4th.

These teas are usually considered higher quality. I could go on forever about this but go look it up and you’ll see what I mean. Once you do you’ll understand a bit more about why I am excited to drink this tea.

Without further ado and because I can’t stand sitting here any longer staring at this package, let’s steep!

The dry aroma is very slight. Maybe because this is only a small sample. But have no fear the wet aroma is fantastic.

Sweet, grassy, with some hints of indistinct florals. The liquid is silky on the tongue. Oh heavens that is nice. Slight astringency with overwhelming (in a good way) grass and hay notes.

This is the first time I’ve done a dragonwell Gong fu style and I must admit it is tough. But so worth it. Oh unique! With the second steeping, I am getting an aroma of asparagus. The flavor remains the same. Maybe a bit more grassy then before.


Want to Know More About This Tea?

Leaf Type:  Green

Where to Buy: Mei Mei Tea

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

photo/logo credit:  Mei Mei Tea

Organic Green Tea/Newman’s Own- The Good Ole Standby. . . . .

Sometimes you just have to drink a bagged tea and honestly when it comes to a bagged green tea I find this one ‘not too shabby’.

I tend to have this one ‘on hand’ for the Green Tea drinkers in my office. It’s a good ole standby. I haven’t had a complaint yet from those who have sipped on it.

Personally, my favorite way to drink this Organic Green Tea from Newman’s Own is to have it ‘on ice’. It’s easy to add natural flavorings to it, too, such as freshly squeezed lemon.

If you haven’t tried a bagged tea in a while – or if you are looking for something for the ‘grab and go days’ – give this a whirl. You might be surprised!


Want to Know More About This Tea?

Leaf Type:  Green

Where to Buy:   Newman’s Own

Description

Organic Green Tea

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

The Tea That Smells Like Lemon Drops. . . Green Lemon/Newby Tea

“If a cup of tea won’t fix it, you really do have a problem.”

I don’t remember where I read that recently, but it seems pretty true at times. I was in a bit of a grump and decided to have a cuppa. This one is new to me, not just the flavor but the brand itself. Mine is an individually wrapped tea bag but the company also sells sachets and loose leaf.

Green lemon had the potential to go bad, very bad. Green tea can be pretty astringent and raw, and lemon can be puckeringly sour, so a combination of the wrong types of those two could be a mistake of epic proportions. Okay, it could turn out to be a bad cup of tea, but when you are in a grump, that is a pretty big mistake.

Instead, I started singing as soon as I picked up my cup. “Where troubles melt like lemon drops, away above the chimney tops, that’s where you’ll find me!”

This tea smells just like lemon drops! Which I love! Bright and sunny, sweet and happy! Yes, it is a little brisk as most green teas are, but it tastes great and I feel the sun peeking out from behind the clouds. No puckering here, just a smile.

Since I needed tea fast, I appreciate the instructions that said to only steep for one to two minutes, and I kept it short. I could handle cup after cup of this. It is so lemony good you might almost hope for a sore throat just for an excuse to sip it all day long.


Want to Know More About This Tea?

Leaf Type:  Green

Where to Buy:  Newby Tea

Description

This tea is no longer available but click below for blends that are.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!

Pearls of Jade/Silk Road Teas

This tea is gorgeous. I actually tipped a spoonful into my hand and examined it in the light, over the top of my glasses so I could really enjoy the detail. These are little curls of army green with swirls of white – real, true, pearly white. In appearance it seems more like an oolong than a green tea.

The odd thing is that this does not taste even remotely like the Bi Luo Chun I have had before, which we refer to in my house as “Cheerios Tea.” That’s how much it tastes like oats and specifically just like the cereal! But does anyone expect tea from Silk Road to taste like something you have had before? I look upon Silk Road as an exotic treat.

So if it doesn’t taste like I expected, what DOES it taste like? And furthermore, why does it taste so different?

The answer to the different taste may lie in the fact that this is a pre-Ching Ming tea. This means that the leaves are some of the very first ones picked of the new spring season, usually at the end of March and beginning of April.

After steeping, I run my fingers through the leaves, now unfurled and beautifully green, in the steeping basket. They are unbelievably soft! They are silky and smooth, and so irresistible that I can’t help but eat a couple of them.

The liquor is pale, a soft yellow, and the second steep is paler still.

My perception of the flavors does not match the description of the website. While it is smooth, it also is making a tingle on my tongue with a gentle and light briskness. There is definitely a floral overtone but it is ghostlike, appearing and disappearing. There is also a vegetal flavor that reminds me of rutabaga, but softer. The body is thin. And I detect a bare hint of roasty flavor, or at least a deep tone under the briskness.

What this tea doesn’t taste like is oats, or buttery, or creamy. And for my Bi Luo Chun, I think I may prefer the oat-y ones.


Want to Know More About This Tea?

Leaf Type:  Green

Where to Buy:  Silk Road Teas

Description

This tea appears to no longer be on the site but click below for their offerings.

Learn even more about this tea and tea company here!